Special Guest Expert - Jules Dan

Special Guest Expert - Jules Dan: Video automatically transcribed by Sonix

Special Guest Expert - Jules Dan: this eJw1jstqwkAUht_lLLqKmZqq0YAUJaUkVkWD0K7CMDOJQ-eSziWhiO_eCdLlfznf-W9AtHJMudr9dgwy2EAEXFmHFWE1p5AlyTxZpS_LCIi3TktvmXkEi-liNk8iwIRoHwj_5ip9jqDhTNBaYTlCGy5Y4H4P2LQWsht4I4J9da6zGULDMMSt1q1guOM2JloianjPUJ-g8dSi6U9_JO3wUabF526Hz6zcN-RUvneb8yQ9LfvrKxZuLRnl-MlqbwhbUz0ooTG9hFcROO7EuGRfHPLtMf_aXqri8FZVk9IHfo5VLLtZ6DXaSOxCcZT3-x8Vjl7_:1mGvIy:rpaGi5R8D_faLaCnwN_QYNt46oo video file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Speaker1:
So here's the big question, how are entrepreneurs like us, we've been hustling and struggling to make it to success who seem to make it one step forward, two steps back. We're getting.

And drip. Finally, breakthrough. That is the question. And this podcast will give you. My name is Brian. This is the. Body.

Speaker2:
Hello, everyone, and welcome, welcome, welcome to the Mind Body Business Show, we have a phenomenal guest lined up for you tonight, this morning from where Mr. Jewelz Dan hails. He hails from Melbourne, Australia. So everyone say good might. I've always wanted to do that on live the first time I've ever done it. I hope I did it. Justice there, George. You can tell me later when you come on the mind body business show. It is a show that we had put together with you in mind, and that is the entrepreneur, the small business owner, the person that's looking for the next way to get them out of their place of stuck where they can get out and just crush it in business. And I have guest after guest on the show who have achieved success in their own areas and in some. In many and our broader than others. And what the beautiful thing I learned in all this time is there are many recipes for success. There are many. But all you really, truly need is one, and if what Joel says tonight resonates with you, you can simply follow him, model him, maybe even connect with him when the show is over and take it to the next level. I have made incredible relationships just by doing the show alone. You can do the same by just reaching out to the guests. It's that simple. This is what this show's about, is to help expose the brilliance of these individuals to you, to the world, so that more and more people can achieve success faster, because let's face it, we don't want to reinvent the wheel over and over do it.

Speaker2:
We don't need to. There are many times success has been achieved and there is a roadmap and there's many and they exist only to find one and follow it. All right. And the reason that the name of this show is because of the three pillars of success I call them, is I studied very successful people for a period of 10 years, and I just harnessed and focused on them to determine what is it that made them potentially more successful than me. I mean, that they did they dress differently? Do they shower differently? They eat differently? I don't know. But now I do. And none of those are the reason that they are more successful. The reason are those three things that are part of the title of this very show mind being mindset to a person. Every single successful person that I was studying had a very positive, powerful and most importantly, flexible mindset. They also took care of their body, literally meaning physically through exercise and through nutrition and what they ingested. And then business business has many, many aspects to it. It's multifaceted with business. These individuals had mastered the necessary skill sets to achieve greatness in their business skill sets like sales, marketing, systematizing team, building leadership. I could really go on for a long time with all of the different skill sets. The good news for you not look, mastering anything or becoming an expert anything can take a very long time. I mean, there's a number that's floating around that's commonly use ten thousand hours. If you've ever done anything for ten thousand hours, you could coin yourself as an expert.

Speaker2:
Well, the good news is you don't need to spend ten thousand hours on every one of those skill sets I just mentioned and the many more that go with building a successful business. If you just concentrate on one, just one skill set, the rest can just take care of themselves. It's pretty amazing. And I actually mentioned that one skill set in that list that I just rattle Radloff here just moments ago, that one skill set is the skill set of leadership, because when you've mastered leadership now, all you need to do is assemble the people that have already mastered those skill sets that you have yet to master and bring them on your team. And now you can just lead the team with all the skill sets in place and crush it in business. But let's face it, not everybody starts out with a team we all started. Most of us start a solo partners, and so we have solo partners to come on the show as well. We have folks showing every every aspect of the journey. And so I'm really happy that you're here watching if you're listening to a podcast, so happy that you're here and you're going to really, really enjoy this young man who's coming up. His name's Jules then. But before I do that, I want to quickly switch gears. There is another trait of highly successful people that I love to spotlight. And what that is, is they are voracious readers of books. And so with that, I like to segway into a little segment I affectionately call bookmarks.

Speaker1:
Bookmarks for you to read, bookmarks ready, steady, read bookmarks brought to you by reach your peak library dotcom.

Speaker2:
There you see it, reach your peak library dot com for those of you watching live, even if you're listening on a podcast and you have access to, say, a computer or a phone where you're going to get the temptation to tap on a browser and go check out a resource, please, I implore of you resist that temptation and instead write down notes on traditional pad of paper with a pen or on your notepad, on your computer, instead of running off and looking at these resources, because I love to say this all the time from stage back when I was speaking on stage. That's going to come up again soon, I hope. And that is the magic happens in the room. So stay with us. Stay in the room, the virtual room. Keep your focus and attention on Jules Dan, because he is going to be dropping bombs of wisdom and knowledge bombs and smart bombs. All you're going to love this. I mean, literally, you're going to see bombs flying on this show. And I'd really love for you to just pay attention because for you, I mean, I have to pay attention. I'm running the show and I get the most out of the show probably than anybody. And I'd like you to get the same amount by just paying attention to Mr. Jewelz. Then he's coming out right after this. Right after this. Real quick to reach your peak library websites, reached your peak library dot com. I had that made and I am not kidding literally with you in mind, because I myself did not begin voraciously reading until the age of forty seven. I will be fifty seven at the end of this month.

Speaker2:
This is August twenty twenty one. And I was just floored by the amount of value and the amount of progress I made in both business and personal life once I began reading the right books, not just any book. And that doesn't say you can't read ledger books and fiction and things like that for enjoyment, not seeing that at all. But if you're looking to really crush it in business, then maybe start picking out books that will help you in that realm. And I've got to tell you that many of these are super interesting. They have great stories are not dry and they're on this list only because I personally have read them. I vetted them. And not every book has made this list that I've ever read. So this is just there for you to just go grab one. And this is not to make money. You click a button, it goes to Amazon. I may make a few cents. I mean, literally, I don't you know, it's amazing. This isn't for money. And as you scroll down, just pick the first book that jumps off the screen that you read the description. Oh, that looks interesting. Just go after that one and then come back and find the next one when you're done with that is wash, rinse, repeat. So that is my gift to you. And we have more gifts on the show. So you'll want to stick around. I'll tell you about that in just a moment. Before we do that, I think it's time for Brian to stop yakking so much and bring on our very, very special guest expert, Jules Dan. Here he comes.

Speaker1:
It's time for the guest expert spotlight, savvy, skillful, professional, adept, trained, big league qualified.

Speaker2:
And there he is, ladies and gentlemen, all the way from Melbourne, Australia, the one the only it is Mr Jewelz. Dan, how are you doing tonight? This morning?

Speaker3:
How are you doing tonight? This Brian, thank you so much for having me on the show today. I really appreciate it.

Speaker2:
It's so cool that I can now boast that this show does time travel because you are tomorrow and I am still today in the future.

Speaker3:
I'm on Friday today. So I'm actually going to go. I like doing curling a bit early on Fridays. It's like a half down in front of me. So lots of lots of reading. You know, you meant you had a book before. You didn't mention this one book. I love this, but I had to get it from my bookshelf. You read this one, right?

Speaker2:
Oh, yes.

Speaker3:
Yes, that is the best one.

Speaker2:
There are many. And I didn't scroll down to the end, but in all honesty, I have not read that book yet. There are so many books.

Speaker3:
Yeah, what you can watch lots of good the like simple reminders and that I love it because the takeaway is there's no ninjak persuasion and influence. It's like it's all been listening to people and just there's a few other little nice things in there. But I think some of them on the show. I really appreciate it, Mother.

Speaker2:
I don't believe so. I'm sorry. Oh, no, because. Yeah, but you know what? I love Ozzies. I love you all. I truly do. I've worked with Australians for a number of years now and it's just, I don't know, instant kinship. It's it's amazing. And we speak the same language that helps a lot. I'll tell you some some argue that.

Speaker3:
But I've been to the states a few times and they like you say, you speak English. My a couple of times that Americans ask, have you got churches in Australia? Oh, my God, do

Speaker2:
You have running water

Speaker3:
Bathrooms. Yeah, yeah, yeah. But in the bush, in sheds and stuff

Speaker2:
Literally in a bush. But anyway, real quick before we move on, I need to do a little bit of housekeeping is what I was trying to say and what I what I wanted to point out. Our sponsors right above Jewelz, left shoulder there on the right of your screen. If you're watching the video at Red Stamp, that is the big insider secrets. That is my good friend Jason Narced, who runs that. And what they have given us, what they provided us to give to you is that one of you who's down with us to the end has the opportunity to win a five night vacation, stay at a five star luxury resort. Again, all compliments of Jason and his incredible business. And Jules, Dan has something for you toward the end of the show as well. He probably doesn't even remember what that was all remind him. And then we have a couple more and we'll get with it. All right, if you're struggling with putting together a live show and it's overwhelming and you want a lot of the processes done for you while still enabling you to put on a high quality show and connect with great people like Jewels, Dan, and grow your business all at the same time, then head on over to carpet bomb marketing, dotcom carpet bomb marketing, saturate the marketplace with your message.

Speaker2:
And one of the key components that is contained in the carpet bomb marketing system is one that you'll learn how to absolutely master. And that is the very services we use to stream our live shows right here on the mind body business show. And right now we're doing it right now. So over the course of over nine years of doing this live TV via the Internet, I've tried many of these quote unquote, TV studio solutions, you know, the software for live streaming. And I'll tell you, I'm a I'm a technique. And I'll tell you, Stream Yade is the best of the best. It combines supreme ease of use and along with unmatched functionality, that just continues rolling out new things. And so you can actually start streaming high quality, professional looking, very, very important professional looking like shows for free with streaming right now. Write this down. Don't go there. Write this down. The URL is are y p dot. I am forgood stream live one more time. It's our whippy dot. I am forgood streaming live. That is the web address. So go ahead and check that out after the show is over because right now it is time to bring on and bring back the amazing tools Dan, and give him the introduction that he deserves. Are you ready Jules? You ready?

Speaker3:
Yeah. It's time to talk about me, bro. Enough about you.

Speaker2:
Exactly. That is going to blow your mind. Are you ready for this? All right. Is Jules Den is a group fitness instructor turned email copyrighter and has a passion for stories. His podcast, Storytelling Secrets, that same with his podcast, is for coaches, consultants and of course, creators who want to unlock their core stories and use their stories to sell more online. It's the place to master persuasion and influence so you can build a deep relationship with your audience. Very key and is the place where real world marketing strategies, tips and lessons are shared freely. I love the real world. I don't want any phony stuff. There's a lot of that and I'm being serious. There's a lot of that phony stuff. Storytelling Secrets. The podcast has been featured in the top one hundred for entrepreneurship in the US and in the top fifty for Australia and the UK. Beautiful and I had the distinct pleasure of appearing on Jules's. Is that Destler Jules's?

Speaker3:
I can say that it's been while for

Speaker2:
Some, what, a few weeks ago. And it was an absolute it was absolute jewels. I really enjoyed it. So Welcome

Speaker3:
Thanks man. We're talking about like ninja hacks and all of that sort of stuff I haven't had anyone talk about before. So it was really interesting, man. And it is being a bit of a journey from twenty twenty when I was made redundant as a fitness instructor because of Target. And then it's been a bit of a wild ride to to get to where I am, but I love it. It's so fun, you know,

Speaker2:
It's so awesome. I was a I was in the fitness industry and I was a certified personal trainer and all that good stuff. I did everything online long before covid hit and I could not get it to go. Then covid hit and then everyone went online just like, wow, that's OK, because I love what I get to do. I'm happier doing what I do now. I love fitness. Still, don't get me wrong, I'm sure you do too, Jewelz. And now I get to do the fun things like this automation of build shows and help people do the same. So it isn't it neat how things can redirect us but for the better when we look back?

Speaker3:
Oh yeah, totally. So I'm so you know, I was kind of at my I was fully deep into the fitness world, Brian. I had a degree in exercise and sports science. I thought I was going to be strength and conditioning coach. However, when I was in my internship, I remember I asked like were elite level coaches. We were doing the same sort of thing, was very formulaic. And I asked them, is this is this what you do every day? Yeah, pretty much. And they had three different roles, like a physio clinic at the school and at an elite sports club. And I'm like, I do not want this at all. And I kind of enjoyed writing, started working on artwork for five bucks an hour just to get some experience while doing the. Group fitness classes put that sort of stuff and then and then covid here now is just forced to sort of just dove into it, had nothing else they could do, and that's why I loved it. So just reading all these direct response books slowly getting better, getting slightly better result, using my money actually to invest in a mentor, to work one on one with him. And then that's when results just started to go like that. And the rest is history. And like you said, it's amazing what circumstances do to make us pivot. But it all comes down to like you said at the start, it's the first it's the first word of your podcast or your show The Mind. It's like how you, like, interpret things.

Speaker2:
And you said something right there that caught my ear, you invested in a mentor. I hear that right.

Speaker3:
Still with him?

Speaker2:
Yeah, so, you know, that is that's a bomb drop right there. I love that and notice what Joel said after he got the mentor, that's when things started really opening up for him and getting better. And that's so true. I've heard this so many times, Jules. And then then you go and work with colleagues or friends that just refuse to bring on anyone, because I got this. I can do this on my own. Or they think, well, that costs money. Well, they don't think about, well, what is it costing you not to hire or invest in a mentor to try to do it yourself and take 10 years to figure it out when with a mentor you could do it in three

Speaker3:
As it's we don't need to spend people unless they're guided with someone. There's something about just that accountability that. I don't know, you just can't really quite get from a book or course just doing it yourself. And not only that, it's the feedback to I think the reason why I got so good so quickly was because I was writing five to seven emails a week on a weekly call with Pate and he would just literally rip them up. This is shit like start again, start again, start again. And it would be going through that pattern for weeks. But then I remember one week it just clicked and it wouldn't have happened if I didn't have that feedback and that guidance. And and like you mentioned, the stop sign. It's not about reading a lot of books that reading the right books. He gave me his whole list of direct response books. He's like, I want you to stop here, write this and I want you to read this. Then I want you to read this. And then I want you to tell me about what you read and how we're going to apply it to your writing. OK, so it was very fun, very intense. But I love this game. I can't wait to share some some some cool things with your audience as well.

Speaker2:
Me too. And it sounds like a phenomenal, phenomenal person to have in your corner as a coach. As a mentor. My goodness. My goodness.

Speaker3:
He's another Aussie too as well. Is that is Pete Godfrey, if anyone's wondering.

Speaker2:
Pete Godfried is that was the deal at the end, Godfrey. OK. Is it the way it sounds if our e

Speaker3:
G r d f a y you are OK? Yeah, I think on the way, if someone asks a question in the FT, I saw a little bubble pop up.

Speaker2:
Yeah. I'm not sure what it was. She said Spears, she said, I may not know exactly who I need. And maybe that was in response to a mentor. I don't know exactly when that came in, but if you would elaborate on that, that would be phenomenal,

Speaker3:
That we got a little we got some audience interaction. I didn't know. That's pretty awesome.

Speaker2:
Oh, yeah. That's that's the beauty of this. The live show arena. Yeah. And love it when people do interact because it makes it that much more fun. Feel free to ask questions and comments and supportive comments or. Yeah. Just keep it positive and have fun. So you have put in the work. If you've invested in yourself with money, you put skin in the game. These are all what I call attributes of a successful person because people that a lot of people that don't succeed wonder why. And all they need to do is listen to someone like you. It's so brutally simple, it's not easy, but it's very simple because, you know, Jules put in the work, I'm sure the investment strained him financially. If it didn't, then it wouldn't have been as effective as it was, because if you don't have enough skin in the game, you're not going to take it seriously. If it doesn't hurt you financially and it doesn't feel a little bit of a strain, then you're going to put less effort into it. No pain, no gain. Right. And so Jules's already dropped a nugget of wisdom for those of you who have not gone down the path of finding a mentor or a coach. And it sounds like he's sharing his with you from Australia. That would be phenomenal. But find a mentor or find a coach in your space. It might be someone who speaks often, does seminars, workshops, boot camps and be ready to invest money. And the reason is, is you want to find somebody that's got results like Jules's mentor. When you find somebody that has the results, they've had the success. Here's the one thing. The missing element I've always found, Jules, because how many times have you gone down this path, this this this path, and then you stopped short on every one of them because another shiny object comes up with my story.

Speaker3:
That's my story.

Speaker2:
Yeah. And I found the reason that we stop is we have lack of certainty that that direction will get us to the finish line. But when you pull in a mentor or a coach that has succeeded, the certainty is already embedded. And all you need to do is blindly follow what they tell you to do, as long as it's in line with your values and its integrity based on all that, that that missing piece is the certainty. And that's why so many people struggle when they don't have a mentor. They have they don't have certainty that what they're doing is going to get them to that that success. What are your thoughts on that?

Speaker3:
Well, what I haven't heard that phrase that way, because that is my story. I did Facebook and bots and stuff. I did Amazon, FBI trying to Kindle Publishing. I did try and did affiliate marketing, but I got halfway and then stopped for whatever reason. I don't know why I got a little bit into it and I didn't really finish it. But like you said, is that certainty because you can you're with that person, you're in constant contact. Maybe it's even a personal relationship and you you understand their story. So when I heard that story where he came from, he was like a working class dude who was working 12 hours at a manual labor job. And he was writing he created his own mail order business. At seven o'clock at night after a 12 hour day, and he slowly got his way out of it and just hearing his story from over 20 years and how he was able to focus on one thing and that was getting better coffee and then obviously getting clients. But just just when he said it gives you that certainty. But when you confessed into your mentor's story as well to push you along, I think that's really powerful.

Speaker2:
Yeah. And oh, my gosh, there's so much behind that, Pete. And what he did, he hustled. I mean, listen to that. He worked 12 hours a day. And then when he got home, he then started cultivating his exit ticket from that that life. And that takes a lot of work. It takes a lot of dedication. It takes a lot of loss of sleep. It takes sacrificing, having a lot of fun and doing things you would normally want to do, like sit on the couch, watch football where your favorite sport is. And so that that's inspiring to know. So. So here you go. There's we're talking about recipes for success. Yeah. You got to you got to roll up your sleeves. Nothing is simple. I mean, nothing is automatic. Nothing is just going to be handed to and then it works. Network marketing companies often say stuff like, well, all you need to do is duplicate yourself. You can't duplicate yourself. It's a relationship building business. But they don't own many of them, unfortunately, don't tout it that way. And they think you're just going to go in and recruit three people and sit back and get rich. It doesn't work that way. It takes a lot of work, a lot of effort. Jules did it. You hired a mentor. I mean, how long did the process take even after you hired a mentor to finally get up to the point where you could bring on clients and start making an income?

Speaker3:
I was I was doing it before I met Pete, and it wasn't a lot of money, to be honest. It's probably like 500 bucks a week or something like that. Maybe a bit less, and when I started working with pay, I just had a retirement at one retirement, a client, a few more gigs coming in, but the results weren't coming in for at least five months. And because it was always I was writing content or that in employment, I might cut just someone to use the company and get a result. And it wasn't until in September of 2010 or October, I can't remember, but it was the first six figure launch for for a client. So I went from having no results to bring in one hundred and fifty for someone with only a two thousand person list. And I almost lost my shit because I was like, yes, I've been waiting so long for this. And it finally happened. And then after that it was just like a campaign for, for a client. Result, result, result. So it took a bit of work, a bit of patience, but I stuck with it and kept going. I mean, I quit.

Speaker2:
Five months is a very short period of time for most people. Anyone. A lot of people would pay well. If it's that good, then, well, that's that's pretty darn impressive. Five months. And here's the thing that you said about after you got that first client. That is so true. The struggle is real. It is mighty until you get that first bona fide client. And once that happens, something triggers in your brain and it's it's on the realm of your already confident what you do, you know, you're doing it good. But until it actually happens, that just takes it's like shifting a car into the next gear and going faster and more effortlessly. And it just it just something clicks and suddenly it just opened the floodgates and you start bringing in client after client. So it's just getting past that first one. And that's what I see. People too often stopped just short three feet from goal where they're big and they don't know there's gold three feet on the other side. And they've been digging for five years and they're almost there. And then they stop. And that's five months is not that long, brother. That's awesome.

Speaker3:
Absolutely. And if anyone's listening as well, for me, I was just having this incredibly imposter syndrome. I was trying to create content. I was trying to bring clients. I didn't have any results to back me up. And I kept thinking, who am I to do this, to monitor this? So I just talk about intangible results or just a little things. I'm working on shopping the saw, but it was until I got that big result that I thought, OK, my POS syndrome is going, I can do this. So whoever's listening just pushed through for that first result because that's when, like you just said, Brian, the guy opens, you know, you can do it and you can speak with confidence that you can do it. And that's what's magnetic to people who want to buy into what you've got.

Speaker2:
And I love that you you said the term imposter syndrome because I think everybody has a little bit of that in them before they reach that pinnacle of the first client. And one thing, one technique or strategy I found that helped me along those lines was and this is just a helpful tip for everyone out there that might be going through that stage is go ahead and start your program, but do it as a beta test program and consider doing it for free and reach out to people, you know, and say I'm doing this to determine if my program is worthy of going launch global, getting paid for it. Would you mind being part of my group and giving me honest feedback throughout your process and journey with me? And I found that to be extremely useful. I didn't have to worry about feeling like an imposter during any of that. I just went back and forth and said, is this working? Is that working? Tell me what doesn't work. OK, thank you. I can refine it and then launch. Let's go. So that's one way to get it. Oh, here we have a clarification from Page. She said everyone mentors from a different space. I may not have found the right one to help me from just starting. Yes, that could be true. Definitely. And that is so true. And not just everyone mentors from a different space. We are all at a different time, in a different location in our journey. It's interesting, isn't it? Have you ever read the same book? More than once, Jules, I know you're kind of young, but yeah,

Speaker3:
I'm reading Richard Branson's book. That's a good one. Read How to influence people. What else? Look at my bookshelf.

Speaker2:
And so those books that you read in the second time, it's exactly the same information that you pull from. Right.

Speaker3:
It's just not don't necessarily have a new perspective the second time. You yet.

Speaker2:
And that that was my point, I was being facetious. The book is totally I used to listen to a CD by my mentor and it became a book later and I listened to it. I don't I lost count how many times it was my Bible for teaching his students from stage. I had listened to it from the event and that was my way of rehearsing in the car. And every single time, every time without fail. Something else I was like, I don't remember hearing that the last time I heard. And so to speak, to Page's point, it's you're in a different space. You are, too. And so your space is moving there. Space might not be in alignment with where you are currently. So, yeah, you might need to find a different mentor. I'm sorry for whoever that is, but go ahead.

Speaker3:
Sorry for cutting you off being like not necessarily like I know what you're doing there. I've actually listen to a podcast from episode one to one hundred and seventy I, I kid you not Brian like eight times and every single time. Oh that's cool. I'll write this down all you. This idea is just as you can tell, I'm very invested with it

Speaker2:
And that's good. I was the same way with my mentor. He just is no longer in the seminar industry for health reasons and nothing other. And he helped me immensely is when I was telling you about right before the show was about that vocalese company. There's a shameless plug for. And so yeah, I had the same relationship and it was like he was much he still is much younger than I am, literally. Could be the difference in age. He could literally be my son by age. That matters to me. And I'm saying this on purpose, because Jules may become your next mentor. He may become my next mentor. I'm fifty. So I don't care about age. I care about results and integrity and character, everything that goes with it. And so don't let anything stop you. Male, female, black, white. None of that matters. It doesn't matter. It doesn't matter. The results are what matter and character and integrity that have to be part of it. That's that's all you need. And then as long as they're a fit and they're in the same stage or at least able to help you in the stage or in page, that would be a recommendation is to find someone that knows how to get you going if you're just starting out. Yeah, you're just starting. Good. All right. Fantastic. This is already a lot of fun. Jewelz, I remember this from our our chat and we talked about it. It was just I know we're going to talk about it just went that way organically. And that's the way it's going tonight. It's phenomenal. Before I go too far down the path, you became an email expert and you obviously put in the time and now you're seeing the success. What what would you say is your ideal target market? Who's your avatar? Is there an age ranges or a company size, that kind of thing?

Speaker3:
Ok, so let's break it down. Coaches, consultants, course creators. That's the herd. But a little bit more specific. Ideally, we've got like a list of around 1500 people. And with that list, you know, we were running pay traffic or traffic to an opt in page or like a webinar, a lead magnet or there's an ad and trying to get people through a VSL. But you need to follow up to booking for a call. That was it, that's that's that's the main thing, especially if you're selling on the phone. Man, we can do some cool things with email. It's the best way to nurture the relationship when people aren't quite ready. And use stories to really persuade them to feel like, OK, if this feels safe to be on a call with someone, because that's the main thing. People don't feel safe getting calls to strangers. And that's why I like using emails and nurture.

Speaker2:
Hmm. That sounds very intriguing. So you take what people already have as far as a list and then you give them their tools to be able to message them in a way that will give them the results. Is that a good way of stating it? Uh, not maybe not,

Speaker3:
That's OK, not maybe not. The way I would say it is, especially if they're coming through like him, that they've put their hand up to say, I'm interested in getting this solution done, but I'm not sure if one. I believe that your thing can actually do it, too. I'm not sure if I have belief in succeeding with your thing because I've failed at multiple different attempts. I don't look like embarrassment, failure to my spouse. All this internal crap comes up and then they're also thinking, you know, do I have the time, money or resources to make this all happen? And so people are interested. The hand up first say, yes, I want the email just out of an impulse. I want the old training just to have an impulse, whatever. But then it's then it's my job and it's the job of the person who's writing these emails to really persuade them in a way that's not crazy. That's not pushy. It's with empathy. Right. So when you understand what's going on, the dove really well, when you know all the trials and tribulations of being able to tell the story of someone else, there's been that exact same situation. That's I think that's how you persuade I'm interested to hear about you, Bronx and I you've got you've had a lot more experience in this. And I have

Speaker2:
No I love that. It's it's about being there are several words. There's transparency, there's authenticity of it. And this is what we learn or what I learn. Speaking from stage is you go up on stage and this could be a webinar. It could be anything, but it's like a constructed presentation. So you have like a PowerPoint slide deck or whatever. And as a speaker, the natural tendency is to think about hitting all the data points and making sure you hit all the bullets and you set it just right. And what I learned over a long period time is people don't care about that nearly as much as they care about hearing a human driven story. Yeah. And they want to that it causes connection, because if you're up there saying, I just made two million dollars and it took me five hours to get there, everyone in the whoever is hearing that message is going to go, oh, well, then I can't do that. So I don't relate to you.

Speaker3:
And I will be seething with anger that they are not successful and you are not. I want that.

Speaker2:
Yeah, I'm in the back and I'm working my frickin butt off and you're up there and flip flops on the stage like you're on the beat and you're making millions. How the heck is this happening? Yeah, you're right. And a lot of emotions go through it. But this is true, Jewelz, and you probably will concur that storytelling is supremely powerful in all forms of communication. So email is written form, video form on stage, live form. If it's audio only form story books. Oh my gosh, there's one. If you're going to write a book, I'll guarantee you someone else has written a book on the very same topic you're about to write on. What would make yours different, your stories? That's what makes you stand out, so that's my opinion on that. Yeah, 100 percent. Hey, I'm supposed to be interviewing you. What's going on here?

Speaker3:
I was going I like to engage the other person so it feels, you

Speaker2:
Know, that's good. And I can tell that's what you do with it. And so you're seeing, ladies and gentlemen, this is this would be how you would do it on the client side, like Jules is saying, well, what's your take? And I want to learn from you. And and here's the other thing I can tell. Jules has let go of his ego. He wouldn't ask me any questions if he had an ego. He would say, I know everything about this. I'm not going to ask anyone else about it. This is all I know. Come on. I don't need you. He asked somebody else just a moment ago for their opinion, and that tells me he's already at a very young age. Learn to get rid of his ego and get it out of the way, because that's one of the pathways to success, is to get that thing out of your way. Because once you do that. Oh, my gosh, then you'll be more open to hiring that mentor or coach. Then you'll be more open to asking and being curious. Richard Branson, one of those curious guys on the planet. He came up to my my mentor during a break at an event in a hotel room and just started peppering him with questions and my mentor is telling the story from he's like a mentor. Richard Branson, I want to ask you some questions. What's going on here? The point is, Richard Branson is very, very wealthy for a reason. He has no ego and he's very curious. What do you think about that, jewels? Have you learned things about ego directly?

Speaker3:
Well, I'm actually reading his book again. And it's really interesting because he is just multi interest, has multiple interests all the time and always trying to be learning something new, like how does someone go from. School to writing a magazine, to running a mail order record business, to a record shop, to a record label, to an airline, to a retail business, you don't do that without being insatiably curious. And I was actually talking on my podcast this morning with his name was A Deal Will Come a a diplomacies, a great copyright really to storytelling, he said. The way you'd be just irresistibly interesting to everyone else is that if you have a lot of interests, that you can connect with people. Because otherwise, if you're just living in this silo, you're not curious about life then not to have much to talk about. And that's that's the thing, right? You're going to be likable. You got to share common interests. Otherwise, I don't know. I feel like what you said. It's definitely true. We need to be we definitely be curious and then just always following up with how like I'm babbling here, I'm trying to say is like just showing the interest of other person as well as as well as being insatiably curious and not just spewing how how curious you are. I think that's

Speaker2:
Yeah. You're genuine about you're being genuinely curious. You're not it's not fake or phony. And one guy that's mastered that I had the luxury of having him on my shows. Les Brown is a world renowned international speaker. Seventy five years old, still crushing it. And I got the unique pleasure of talking to him not just on this show, but on the phone one on one several times. And he always employed everything you're talking about. He was deeply interested in what I did. I'm like, you're Les Brown. I want to hear about you. You know, I'm thinking in my head. And he's the most gracious, wonderful person. And he makes you feel good about yourself. He just says, you are amazing. He just has all these great things. He's never met you before. He's just a wonderful human being. And of course, that makes him extremely likable, like you're saying. But it's with authenticity. That's the key. It's not. It's not. You know, if you normally aren't a person that's praising other people, then don't just go out and start doing it. You know, ease into it, practice it, learn it until it becomes comfortable and it becomes you don't do it fake or phony.

Speaker3:
I like this little thing. I mean, I told me that was a picture. The other person is a movie and you are buying into that movie and you're really interested in that movie rather than trying to speak first. Because I remember one of the questions you wrote in your questionnaire was like, what were the top three skills? And surprisingly, I reckon one of them, one of the best ones was active listening or just being very curious. You know, the person because I feel I know about you, Brian, but how many times are you talking to someone and they're just waiting to pounce, to talk.

Speaker2:
And I'll be honest, I've been guilty of doing that many times myself.

Speaker3:
Sure, we all have, right? Yeah. But the key is awareness, that's the first step and. And I know for you, so what what would your top I'm interested here because your show is all about success, mind, body, business, what would your top three skills. But if you could just narrow it down to one, what would your top skill be?

Speaker2:
Never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever give up. Consistency, persistence, perseverance, drive, determination. It's all encapsulated into one is if you don't have the drive, don't even go down that path. You need to develop it. Or you just weren't you weren't innately given it. Because as you can hear from George, he went through a struggle. He went he had to completely shift his whole business model because of a pandemic. He had to stop doing what he was doing. It turned out to be a blessing. Thankfully, he just buckled up this is his shoes and pulled up his pants and went to work. And he got a mentor.

Speaker3:
And my husband had to pull up my chair. I learned how to touch type. You know, I was actually talking with two fingers before I started. So I was like, I have to learn. And this is ridiculous.

Speaker2:
Yeah. Oh, man. OK, that would be a skill set. Learn how to type. Definitely. I did that in goodness. Seventh or eighth grade was the first time I and these were mechanical with your fingers would literally get stuck in between them at times but yeah. Yeah. Just don't give up no matter what people say. And unfortunately sometimes those people are your very closest family people

Speaker3:
Who want to get you

Speaker2:
And they want the most for you, yet it feels like they don't win. That kind of stuff happens.

Speaker3:
This is Kelly, Kelly Bryant, Boza. So this is a deep topic because what you're really doing is because have you heard this hypothesis before that? The reason why family doesn't want you to succeed because if you succeed, it makes them feel inadequate or they aren't living up to success.

Speaker2:
It's a universal inside family, outside family and maybe more because you're closer. And, yeah, it makes sense. It totally makes sense. But it's just like, look, I'm going to take you with me. You're my family. You're going to come let me ride with me. I'm not leaving anybody. At least I would there might be others that say I can't wait to get out of this family need to get out of here. And that's that's different. But it's universal. That's why a lot of people see a very elaborate, very expensive sports car going down the road next to them. And they're like swearing at them. You son of a bitch. You probably you probably just got that that you had a rich uncle or something, you know, it's like, well, if you're that way, if you think about people that way that make money, then it is impossible for you to ever reach that pinnacle of financial wealth in your life because you cannot ever achieve something that you despise. It won't happen. Yeah. Why not turn that around them and say, you know, I they obviously most LEMP listen, most everyone you see that has wealth that you know of worked very hard. Yes. There are some that didn't that got, you know, some kind of windfall from mom or dad or grandpa. That's OK. They will usually self sabotage and throw it all away. Those that didn't work for it, typically, if they're not brought up in the right way, but most people work hard for it.

Speaker2:
Just say, hey, bless them, they got really wealthy doing something, hopefully serving others. And I hope they get even more money so they can help more people. That's what entrepreneurs do. Jules, I've not interviewed a single person on this show. That is what drives every one of us is we would love to serve people and I want you jewels to become enormously wealthy. I sincerely I want you to because I know you will just go out and help more people and just expand your business. I just know you will. And yeah, go buy some toys, have some fun, enjoy what you've done at the same time. There's absolutely nothing wrong with that. No guilt whatsoever. You know, take a victory lap or two or ten and just keep crushing it and keep helping people build a business, sell it, let it keep helping people go. Get another one. Build another one. That's the way we roll it. Got me all excited there, buddy. I was good. That was good, um. Yeah, so you have a podcast and it was a lot of fun. How's that been? How are you using that? Is it is it becoming a marketing tool in its own right for you or what are you using it for in your business at the moment?

Speaker3:
Yeah, good. To be honest, I started with zero audience, zero influence. Actually wasn't a copyright on when I first started it, I started when I was actually doing the gym and I was just interested in storytelling, in direct response. So it's been a good tool to document the journey along the way. I said in my mind's eye, where I share hard won lessons from real world. So usually every week I just report back with a little win an idea, something that was good that happened. And it's been a really good way to document the journey. So that's that back to like you said, it's a good marketing tool. It's a better networking tool for me right now. So I'm not at say like, what's your read? Joe Rogan has something like 50 million downloads a month and that was in twenty eighteen. So we don't even know how ridiculous it is right now. I'm not even close to that, not even know even it. Like there's like one like per cent of that. But like I said, it isn't to build the list, it isn't to get, you know, the audience to come clients. It's the best networking tool ever. And it's allow me to meet amazing people because of it, such as yourself. Right. And build a relationship with them and had some clients come out of that way. But the main thing is the network. I'm sure you agree, Brian. You've met some amazing people along the way because of your show.

Speaker2:
I might agree just ever so slightly with that, yes. You just hit the nail on the head. I interviewed a gentleman by the name of Seth Green and he co-hosts a podcast with Kevin Harington. Kevin Harrington was one of the first sharks on the On the Shark Tank, the show and as seen on TV mogul infomercial juggernaut, Guy and I met him and shared the stage with them. He's an awesome dude, awesome guy. Seth Green, when I interviewed him on this show, he said nearly the same thing you just said, because they have over six hundred and thirty six hundred thirty plus episodes, a lot podcast. So do you think they know what they're doing if they're still around and they're doing that many? And so I asked him a similar question, Jules, and I was so ecstatic over his answer and he said, we don't care about subscribers, we don't care about downloads, we don't care about ratings, we don't care about rankings. It's all about leveraging the guests that we have on our show and their network and getting those relationships and building relationships. He said it is not about the audience, it's not about the number of listeners. It's not about the number of downloads. It has nothing to do with it. It's not about finding sponsorship. It's about making the relationship with the people you are interviewing and then leveraging their their tribe along the way and doing it as a win win. And that was that was a mic drop moment because so many jewels and I was one of them was like, how do I monetize our podcast? How do I monetize a live show? You don't. Not directly. Most of us don't unless you're Joe Rogan. Right. Let's you have a big name and you've been out there a

Speaker3:
Hundred million dollars with Spotify. That ain't going to happen. Dymock, that you'll go.

Speaker2:
It could happen. And if it is your goal, make it your goal to the audience. But but don't go in it and think you're just going to do a podcast for a year or two and you're going to become wealthy. It doesn't happen that way normally. Just just saying that. And yeah, you would want to make it your entire focus if that's what your goal is. Everything should be on that and nothing more and nothing else. But yeah. So that was very telling. And he was spot on because I had been doing this for over two years at the point that I had that interview with him. And that's exactly what was happening for me. I had people that I had, like I always say this, my my show this show is not my business. Just like your podcast is not your business, you're just talking and you're building your own platform, people getting to know you, and as a result of that, they become more comfortable in doing business with you when you have a pain that you solve of theirs. That's it. It's that simple. It's simple, but it takes time, takes effort. I've been doing this almost three years, just this year alone.

Speaker2:
It takes time. Perseverance, consistency, persistence. Everything I said. So, yeah. You hit the nail on the head, Jules, and thank you for being honest about that, because some people would just be flat out embarrassed and wouldn't want to admit that I don't get up. I got my ten thousand download of the audio podcast recently, and I thought to me that was a huge deal. But at the same time, I'm thinking it's still not what is important. It's after the fact people go to look for you up there. You have a business, you do email copywriting. So what does what does somebody that's never heard of you before that now is interested? What are they going to do? What do you think? They're going to Google you. They're going to look everywhere. What are they going to find you podcast here, guest on a podcast there. He's on a show like this guy is everywhere. That means he's not just a tire kicker. He's real, he's real. He's bona fide. He works hard. And if he works hard that way, he's going to work hard when I'm his client. See how that works, Brian?

Speaker3:
There's just so many benefits as well. So like he said, don't focus on the numbers, but you can leverage the guests. So, like Brian came to my show, I come on to his show. You guys see that relationship. So it's a really good platform for you to guest speak on other people's platforms because you can exchange platforms. So really good opportunity to get better at public speaking. I think that's an awesome skill to have. What else is there? I mean, that's how we met.

Speaker2:
I had I had a guest on my show. She hooked me up with you or vice versa, because we each knew each other. It was through relationships built from this very network. I mean, I'm intrigued by your copywriting skills. There may be an opportunity for us to joint venture down the path when we get off the show. I'm not going to sell or pitch you on anything. I never do. Things happen naturally. That's how it works and it works wonderfully well. So anyway, yeah, you had a lot and I think I cut you off.

Speaker3:
Oh no. I was just thinking what what are some other really good benefits of starting a podcast? Like you said, it's the added authority as well. Just just just saying your podcast has that ring reference. I oh this person knows this shit.

Speaker2:
And that goes true. So there's like I'll never forget a gentleman, his name's Rick Frishman. I don't know if he's still doing it, but he used to do author one on one university twice a year, once in Nevada, once in California. And he he's an expert on publishing books and everything about books for business. And one of the things he said, I will never forget, he said The most important thing you can do in your business is what he called building your platform. That was books. Yes. And everything else you can do, like podcasting, like live shows. Now, back when I learned all this from him, I don't think life shows existed. And anything you can to get exposure is your platform. So books is another huge. That's a huge I can't tell you how many jewels that I've interviewed. That said, the moment they authored and published their first book, their business just took off. It's still true today. So a book is Another Arrow in your quiver to I've got my 90 percent done. I got to just pinch it off and get it done, be done with it and get it out there. And I can't wait. And I've got a second one that's already in the works before the first one's even done. So it's crazy. But a book is another great way. So you are building authority is a definite plus speaking on stage. Jules, you're like you're very you've got a great personality. I'm a guy, so don't take this the wrong way. But you're a good looking dude and I think you would be phenomenal on stage. You have a good presence and speaking and I'm talking physical stage in addition to the virtual I know you guys are locked down, but when that opens up, get on stage the moment you're invited or or stick your foot up there and say I'm next. Your mentor might give you some connections to do that as well.

Speaker3:
Yeah, hopefully I cut my teeth actually with Toastmasters and that was a lot of fun. My only gripe with Toastmasters was you go there for like a two hour meeting and I probably had like five minutes of practice out of two hours. But if you're just getting started and you want to get into public speaking. I highly recommend you do it. It was just invaluable transfer a lot of the skills from Toastmasters to being a podcast host and now being a podcast get podcast guest, asking you questions, being engaging. That's something.

Speaker2:
Yeah. Yeah. You learn intangible things like that, not just how to speak properly. And Sarah and I went to Toastmasters several times after I learned advanced speaking skills from my mentor and his team. And it was interesting because that has Zuhur advanced that we were using NLP for good. It was none of this hocus pocus. And we didn't say things like by now because that's why in all those it was all used on the up and up, but it was how to properly present and tell stories. The whole thing was for the giving the audience the result. It wasn't about us. It was about what can we do to make their day worth sitting here and watching and listening to us? How can we get them the best results possible? Then you learn different tools and techniques on how to reframe the event, how to ask questions and interact, how to stay in control of the conversation. If the other speakers didn't have Hechler, all that, all that put together, then you got to Toastmasters. Like to me it was like, this is kind of like child's play. It's kind of fun. But and I know so if you go multiple times, ultimately, you get to be one of those that gets to be the featured speaker and speak for longer than a few minutes. But yeah, it is a great thing. I went to several different chapters and gave it a go and I'm OK. It's different. It's not. I'm interested in the seminar industry speaking from stage that way there was more of a corporate kind of approach to speaking, which was different and well, pardon.

Speaker3:
I said that's interesting because the chapter I went to was like everyday people in their careers who wanted to get a little bit better at speaking and pausing. There's a lot of international people like people on visas who went there because I would I wanted more confidence to speak up in the workplace. And there wasn't anyone. There's only a one on the person there for business. But like you said, it, skills are transferable. It's oh, yeah, I highly recommend.

Speaker2:
Yeah, definitely. I mean, jeez, it's it's a really great way to learn and to get comfortable speaking in front of a group. And that's a great way to do it, because you're among friends who are there to help you. You may have never met them before, but they're all there for the same reason. So they're not ever going to heckle you, that they're not going to give you a hard time. They're going to be assisting you in providing you feedback so it can get better. Yeah, and that's one of the.

Speaker3:
Go ahead. I was going to say one of the cool things I do is they make you do improv like table topics. And this is a new study that the more the better you get at improv, the more creative you are and the more persuasive you are, just unconsciously by betting, by getting better at improvising. So it's just different situations. Have you have you seen that? I don't if it's a study or an article or something like, oh,

Speaker2:
I haven't seen the study, but I did do the tables up. It was like two minutes. Right, right. Yeah, I get it. I want to bolster brag, but I did it twice and all the times I went and I won both times so it was pretty fun and I was like right under two minutes. Those are the things we learned was time management without having a clock in front of us all good stuff. But it was fun, definitely fun, engaging and yet improv is fun where they just give you a topic and you just start talking for two minutes. It's pretty cool.

Speaker3:
It's a it gets sometimes you freeze, but then other times you just babble and then other times pure gold comes out of your mouth and you're like, where did that come from. Oh my gosh.

Speaker2:
And that happens when the nerves go away and the ego goes away and you're just being yourself. And that's the thing. That's why scripted presentations aren't as effective. You can have an outline for a talk or seminar WELLCAMP but to script it and read it every word, especially if you're up on stage and you're just recounting what you memorized. It's not as. Impactful, let's just say that unless you've gotten really good and you're like a movie actor and you know how to read, so that sounds like you're talking and you're really acting out, the emotions are natural. Very few people have that skill set.

Speaker3:
But it was a script is really important. In your e-mails, yes, you definitely need definitely to think that through. It's not just like, oh, my God, let's just write this on a whim. Let's put no thought into it. Let's just get it done. It needs a bit more strategy. One that I know we've gone for an hour now, so I don't have much time. We've got to dove into that.

Speaker2:
But my goodness. Thank you very much. That's a good sign that it's been a lot of fun and yeah, it's normally an hour long show, I hope folks can hang around for a little bit more. We'll give away the prize. Let's do that now. So that honor there and respect their time. You have one to give away as well. And then before we end the show, Jules, I'd like to ask that there's one final question every time that I love to ask. And it's a very powerful, profound, not because of the question, but because of the answers I get. I ask the same one each and every show. I hope you didn't cheat and listen to one before this one to know what it is. But even if you did good, you're going to love it. So before we do that, real quick, I'm so glad you said time. You're watching it better than I am. I was just having too much fun talking to you. That's a very good sign.

Speaker3:
Very boring. I have to get ready, you know.

Speaker2:
Good. I think I'm just mesmerized by that white microphone. And that thing is so white and so, Bletch, it's like, wow, that's pretty neat. All right. Here is how you can win a five night stay at a five star luxury resort. For those of you watching live, US and guest speakers are eligible to win. I'm not kidding. It's randomly selected and I just don't know if Australia is in. We'll find out. I don't know. Not all countries

Speaker3:
Are on Earth.

Speaker2:
Yeah, you do have running water. I think we did. That's good.

Speaker3:
All right. The pond. Sorry. Continue.

Speaker2:
That's good. So if you're watching. So now you do have our permission to, just for a moment, take your attention away from the screen because you need to bring up a browser of some kind or your phone browser application so you can go to a website, which I'll put up on the screen for those of you watching. And that is our IP dot. I am for vacation. So our WIP stands for Reach Your Peak just to make a little easier. That's the name of my company are IP. I am bored slash vacation and just enter your information there and you'll be entered into a random drawing and we'll announce the winner later this evening. Whoever does win will get contacted directly via text and and or email. We'll decide on that and then we'll announce the winner. And I hope you win whoever is out there watching. I look forward to handing you that wonderful prize. Again, this is all brought to us by the big insider secrets. That is Jason Narced and his company, my best buddy in the world. He's a great guy. Speaking of great guys, we've got this guy with a microphone, Jewelz Dan, who might have something for all of you, if you recall what that was.

Speaker3:
I've got to here. I've got it here week,

Speaker2:
So go ahead and take it away. I'll pull up the appropriate website so you can explain how folks can get to that.

Speaker3:
Ok, no problem. All right, sir, if if you're a coach consultant, Coskata, you know, you've got an email list and you're trying to put people opting in it through like a webinar late monitoring Facebook ads. But the back end isn't converting. So you're not getting customers booked on the calls or making a sale or anything like that. I got something really cool for you guys. Normally I charge around fifteen hundred bucks for this. This is like a consulting audit, right? Right, go through your back end emails and look at the strategy. Look at the copy different than the headline, the subject lines and tell you how to make more money basically with that consulting code. But we've got something special for brines listeners. And that's basically for free, so if you'd like to redeem it or you got to do is just send me an email to support at Jewelz, then dotcom. Let's just say subject line will be mind body business, Jewelz Freebie or something like that. If you can't remember that crazy subject line, then a problem.

Speaker2:
Is that what I had on the screen there, Jules?

Speaker3:
Well, that is just my website, which leads to a book called. But if you'd just like to shoot me an email and not go through all the steps as well. Then you're more Welcome to that.

Speaker2:
So in order to shoot you an email, could they go to your website? Is there a contact form as well?

Speaker3:
No, no.

Speaker2:
All right.

Speaker3:
And so there is a book called. Oh, that is my email I just put in the chapter on if that helps, good,

Speaker2:
Let me see where that is and I'll post that to everyone. Thank you for that. That is watching this will show up on all the screens that we are going live on at the moment. You know, lot of comments and pasted and awesome for just you, I just mentioned mind body business show somewhere in the email, subject line, whatever, and then that should jog Jules's memories. A young guy, he'll still remember stuff like that. I might forget being an older guy. Yeah, but

Speaker3:
And this isn't this isn't like fake fifteen hundred dollars thing. But last week I had someone, a very cool client video ad production guy for Russell Brunson. Don't tell him that I gave this away for free for brines people. But it's a special thing I wanted to give to you guys.

Speaker2:
Fantastic. So just email him, you see the email in the stream, if you are unable to get that, I'll say it verbally. And for how long is this going to be good for Jewelz, for those that might be hearing this as a recording?

Speaker3:
Well, we're going live. OK, we're going to make it seven days. Can't be loitering, guys. Can't be sitting on your hands.

Speaker2:
All right, so in seven days, be sure to email or not, in some days before seven days is up. What that means is email him right now. Not kidding. Do it now. Take action. Action is rewarded. Support at Jewelz Dan dot com. It's less day and dot com or put the wrong button there. So I want the website benter Jewelz. Dan dot com. So you want support at what you see on the screen. Jewelz, Dan dot com. So go ahead and shoot off that email so you can be one of those lucky recipients of this very secretive, secretive prize. You want to tell anybody about it?

Speaker3:
Because I just gave the. That's not a secret.

Speaker2:
Just don't want to tell the folks.

Speaker3:
Oh, yeah.

Speaker2:
Yes. So we do have this one final question. We have gone over that on time. I appreciate you both. Jewels for you sticking on and all of you who are watching us live. Plus those who are going to watch this or are watching as a recorded video and those who are listening on podcasts. Appreciate you all. And on that note, if you want to get an automated reminder, and that's all they are, is just automated reminder of the show about to go live and just go to the mind body business, show dotcom. And on there you will see lots of buttons that tell you when and where to watch. And you just click on any one of those. It'll it'll instantly jump you to the bottom and enter your contact information there. And you'll get an email message every time we go live. And you can opt out any time you want. And we don't use that list to try to sell you anything. Like I said, my show is not my business. It is here to inform and educate and help you get to the next step faster because of amazing people like this guy Jules Dan, who come on the show and share their their genius and wheel and brilliance. With that, said, Jules, the great thing about this question, yeah, there is no such thing as a wrong answer. It does not exist, you cannot get the answer wrong,

Speaker3:
But they can be bad answers.

Speaker2:
No, I mean, the exact opposite is the truth, that the only correct answer, the only correct answer is yours.

Speaker3:
All right. Let's hear it then.

Speaker2:
Does that get you a little curious, just a little bit

Speaker3:
Gets me half in, sort of.

Speaker2:
And so it's just a smidgen personal only because it's unique to you, that's all as deep as it goes is personal, but I find it very profound what the answers are. So with that. Are you ready? Mm hmm. That's a yes, I heard it, I heard it. OK, all right, here we go. Jules, Dan. How do you.

Speaker3:
Define success. What I say is that if you can wake up every single day and get excited to do what you do. The work that you do has a ripple effect on other people's lives, you get paid well to do it. That's me success.

Speaker2:
Hmm, you know what's coming?

Speaker3:
Yes, beautiful

Speaker2:
Ladies and gentlemen, that is Jules, then right there, the man, the myth, the legend. Thank you so very much, Jewels, for coming on the show, for dropping such incredible value for everybody. And the thing I love about this is this show isn't just alive. It's around for as long as we have discussed to keep it on and Web servers for podcasts and other things and video. So your gifts will live for a very, very long time for those that come on, because you gave a lot of timeless advice. And I appreciate that. And for you giving so freely of your time and your wisdom. So I appreciate you, my brother.

Speaker3:
Thanks, Brian. I really, really appreciate you coming on for letting me come on your show. Man, I really liked it.

Speaker2:
And thank you for having me on yours as well. So look up, Jules. Dan, what's your podcast name again?

Speaker3:
Storytelling secrets.

Speaker2:
Storytelling secrets. I love that. And so if you want to hear some great stuff, learn how and he's developing his writing skills, you're got to learn from that because that's what he does. He tells stories and that show empathy. And I'm sure he'll be revealing some of those great stories on his podcast if he hasn't already that his secrets. I love it. All right. We've got to turn this thing off for the night. I could go on for another hour. But, you know, it is getting later here in the US. And I know it's just still morning there. I think it is. But it's almost like. All right, well, we got to let them eat. All right. So on behalf of the amazing jewels, Dan, I am your host, Brian Kelly of the Mind Body Business Show. We will be back again next time with another great episode. Until then, have a great, great evening. So long and be blessed, everyone. Bye bye for now.

Speaker3:
Thank you for tuning in to the mind body

Business show podcast at w w w dot the mind body business show dot com.

Speaker3:
My name is.

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Jules Dan

Jules Dan is a group fitness instructor turned email copywriter and has a passion for stories.


His podcast Storytelling Secrets, is for coaches, consultants and course creators who want to unlock their core stories and use their stories to sell more online.


It’s the place to master persuasion and influence so you build a deep

relationship with your audience.


And it’s the place where real world marketing strategies, tips and lessons are shared freely.


Storytelling Secrets has been featured in the top 100 for entrepreneurship in the US and in the top 50 for Australia and the UK.


And If you’ve ever wondered…


“I don’t have a big list.”

or

“How do I get people excited, ready to buy and shoot for a 5 or 6 figure launch?”


Then you're in luck.


Amongst other things, Jules will explain his Triple H Sequence to warm up your email list before your next launch.

Connect with Jules:

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